Connect with us

Education

BREAKING: I’ve Been In A Dark Period Over ASUU Strike- Adamu

Published

on

The minister of education, Adamu Adamu, on Tuesday said he had been in a dark period of personal anguish and internal turmoil following the lingering strike by the Academic Staff Union of Universities.

EKO HOT BLOG reports that was made known during the meeting with vice-chancellors and pro-chancellors of federal universities at the National Universities Commission in Abuja on Tuesday.

“For me, the past two weeks have been a very dark period of personal anguish and internal turmoil. I used to deceive myself that in a climate of frankness, and with mutual goodwill, it will fall to my lot to bring an end to the incessant strikes in the education sector.

This has not proved possible, or, at least, not as easy, quickly and straightforward, as I used to think.

“Distinguished Chairmen, vice-chancellors, I called you today not to share with you my anguish but to share with you the details of what we have done and what remains to be done. And certainly, a lot remains to be done. But for very different reasons, the current positions of Government and ASUU on the future of negotiations seem to have coincided.

“For me, this is a position I would have wanted us to reach after an amicable resolution of all the issues contained in the 2009 Agreements. It appears that we are running ahead of the negotiations but not for the right reasons. The President of ASUU has been reported to have said the Union would no longer negotiate with the current Federal Government.

“This position must be resisted. Government and ASUU have no option than to continue talking until our universities have reopened their doors to students, who clearly are the principal victims of the seemingly unending strikes. In the circumstances, therefore, all Councils and Senates of our universities are enjoined to rise up to their responsibilities.

“We must, together, continue to work to restore our public universities to where they were in the 60s and 70s. As the most important officers in our university system, Pro-Chancellors and Vice-Chancellors, must demonstrate more commitment to ending the ongoing strike.

“As Chairmen of Councils and Senates – the highest policy and academic bodies in the system – you must consider it your paramount duty to promote policies and actions that will discourage industrial disputes in our campuses. Government will continue to support the physical and academic development of its universities.

Government will continue to reasonably enhance the working conditions of all university staff, academic and non-teaching.

“The main challenge, as you are fully aware, is dwindling resources available to address all the concerns of the citizenry. We thank you for your support, understanding and sacrifices.”

ASUU had embarked on a strike on Monday, February 14, 2022 following what the union tagged as failure of the government to meet lingering demands

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Education

ASUU Brace For Another Face-Off With FG

Published

on

The Federal Government and members of the Academic Staff Union of Universities, ASUU may be bracing for another round of face-off, recent developments between the union and the government have indicated. 

Fidel Info reports that The Minister of Education, Adamu Adamu, has insisted that the government will not pay full salaries to lecturers despite their ongoing nationwide protest.

Adamu, made this stance while speaking with State House correspondents in Abuja on Wednesday.

The minister insisted that the government resolution,  that the protesting lecturers would not be paid for work not done, was in line with the ‘No work no pay’ policy.

Recall that ASUU had on Monday begun protests across the country to press home their demand for full pay after the Federal Government refused to pay them for the eight-month period the lecturers were on strike.

ASUU, which had earlier, in February, embarked on strike, called off their strike in October, following an order by the Court of Appeal.

Following the development, the government paid the lecturers half salaries for the month of October while insisting that it would not pay for the eight months they were on strike.

But, ASUU began protests across the country over the half salaries paid by the government for the month of October.  

In reaction to the protest, the education minister declared on Wednesday that the lecturers “would not be paid for work not done.”

The minister also reacted to the allegation made by the President of ASUU, Professor Emmanuel Osodoke, that paying the lecturers on a pro-rata basis was a ploy to make them casual workers.

“Nobody can make university lecturers casual workers,” he said. 

Adamu said he was not aware that the lecturers were threatening a one-day action to protest the government’s action.

Continue Reading

Education

ASUU Branches Begins Traditional Voting Today

Published

on

Branches of the Academic Staff Union of Universities will begin their customary vote today (Tuesday) and tomorrow (Wednesday) about the union’s ongoing strike.

The National Executive Council will receive the various branches’ decisions for final decision-making.

This information was provided to the PUNCH correspondent in Abuja by a highly-placed source within the NEC on Tuesday.

“We got the directive after the meeting with the speaker yesterday(Monday). The intervention was timely. Branches will vote between today and tomorrow after which the decisions will be convened to the NEC,” the source said.

The new development follows a meeting with Femi Gbajabiamila, speaker of the House of Representatives, who organized many talks between the union and the Federal Government side.

The strike would end in a few days, according to Femi Gbajabiamila, SAN, the lead attorney for ASUU, who also stated this to The PUNCH.

The government’s inability to satisfy ASUU’s unmet requests, according to the union, prompted the union to go on strike on Monday, February 14, 2022.

After “failed negotiations,” the minister of labor and employment Chris Ngige hauled the lecturers on strike to the National Industrial Court.

On September 21, the National Industrial Court ordered ASUU to end the strike.

The federal government’s request on notice was granted by the court, ordering the lecturers back into the classrooms.

In his decision on the interlocutory injunction, trial judge Polycarp Hamman prohibited ASUU from carrying out the industrial action until the outcome of the lawsuit brought by the federal government against ASUU.
Unhappy with the decision, the union went to the appeals court to challenge it.

Additionally, a request for a stay of the Industrial Court’s judgment was made.

The Court of Appeal ordered the striking lecturers to “immediately” call off the eight months strike, having struck out ASUU’s application for a stay of execution of the lower court’s order.

It said it was within ASUU’s right to appeal the decision of the industrial court.

Agreeing with the federal government’s argument that ASUU cannot approach the appellate court with “dirty hands”, the panel held, “should the applicant fail to obey the order (of the lower court), the leave granted shall be automatically vacated.Branches of the Academic Staff Union of Universities will begin their customary vote today (Tuesday) and tomorrow (Wednesday) about the union’s ongoing strike.

 

Continue Reading

Education

FULL DETAILS: Appeal Court Orders ASUU Immediately Call Off Eight-month Old Strike

Published

on

The Academic Staff Union of Universities’ request for leave to appeal was approved by the Court of Appeal in Abuja (ASUU).

The leave so granted enables ASUU to formally contest the National Industrial Court’s interlocutory order directing its members to return to work until the outcome of the Federal Government’s substantive lawsuit against the strike that ASUU had initiated. The order was issued on September 21.

A three-judge panel of the court, presided over by Justice Hamma Barka, issued an order on Friday directing the professors on strike to “immediately” end their eight-month strike.

The court struck out ASUU’s request for stay of execution of the Industrial Court’s order, which its lawyer, Femi Falana (SAN) withdrew on Thursday.

The appellate court said should ASUU fail to re-open the universities, the order to appeal against the interlocutory injunction of the National Industrial Court “will be automatically vacated.”

It gave the union seven days within which to file its notice of appeal against the order issued by the National Industrial Court.

Justice Barka said, in the lead ruling, that “I am inclined to granting the application to appeal the decision of the National Industrial Court of Nigeria.

“But, the order of the lower court shall be immediately obeyed.”

Justice Barka agreed with ASUU that it was with its right to appeal the decision of the Industrial Court.

The judge also agreed with the Federal Government that ASUU could not approach the appellate court with “dirty hands” having failed to first, comply with the September 21 order.

He said “should the applicant (ASUU) fail to obey the order (of the lower court), the leave so granted shall be automatically vacated.”

Continue Reading

Trending